Side by Side Charleston

Author: kevinstlaurent

The Charleston rhythm was part of the musical and dance evolution that brought us the Lindy Hop and is a very important part of the rhythmical and movement vocabulary of any swing dancer. In any given social dance you many variations of the Charleston rhythm mixed in with 6 and 8 count steps are used. The Side by Side Charleston is the best starting point when trying Charleston with a partner.

Kick Ups

Author: kevinstlaurent

Also known as "Kick the Dog" or "Skip Ups", Kick Ups end with a big flashy kick to the front. It's a great move to use to finish a musical phrase after doing some side by side Charleston and Pendulum kicks. 

Tandem Charleston

Author: kevinstlaurent

Tandem Charleston can take a moment to get used to as it requires the follower to feel the lead without being able to see the leader.  Both roles should feel confident with their basic Charleston rhythm. Do it small at first until you find the flow with your partner.

Tandem Entrance

Author: kevinstlaurent

It's good to know where you are going before you get there, that's why we teach the entrance after you have had a chance to practice the Tandem itself. This flashy entrance uses everything you have learned so far from the Side by Side to the Kick Ups and then a turn into Tandem.

Tandem Exit

Author: kevinstlaurent

This Tandem exit brings you into open position and is a great option for transitioning into another rhythm (6 count or 8 count) or you can get back to closed position and keep up the Charleston. 

The Swing Out

Author: kevinstlaurent

The Swing Out is the most important Lindy Hop move you will ever learn, and something even the most seasoned professionals continue to refine and experiment with. A good Swing Out feels delicious, dynamic and full of possibility. This is one of those lessons that even if you think you have got it mastered, watch it two or three more times before moving on.

Swing Out from Closed Position

Author: kevinstlaurent

Swinging out from the closed or jockey position the most common way to start a dance or transition from the 6-count footwork to 8-count (More on this on the 6, 8 and charleston transition lesson).