8 Count Footwork

The 8-count triple step footwork pattern forms the basis of Lindy Hop. Learn it, love it, and live it. Practicing the footwork solo is an important step before the challenge of touching/connecting to a partner. You must earn the right to touch a partner by doing the solo practice first.

Tandem Entrance

It's good to know where you are going before you get there, that's why we teach the entrance after you have had a chance to practice the Tandem itself. This flashy entrance uses everything you have learned so far from the Side by Side to the Kick Ups and then a turn into Tandem.

Follower & Leader Yo-Yo

The Yo-Yo helps create the framework for the Swing Out and other classic moves. It's great for partner technique and rhythm practice and may not be all that common on the social dance floor, however, it is essential for building up to the vocabulary to come.

Tandem Exit

This Tandem exit brings you into open position and is a great option for transitioning into another rhythm (6 count or 8 count) or you can get back to closed position and keep up the Charleston. 

The Swing Out

The Swing Out is the most important Lindy Hop move you will ever learn, and something even the most seasoned professionals continue to refine and experiment with. A good Swing Out feels delicious, dynamic and full of possibility. This is one of those lessons that even if you think you have got it mastered, watch it two or three more times before moving on.

Swing Out from Closed Position

Swinging out from the closed or jockey position the most common way to start a dance or transition from the 6-count footwork to 8-count (More on this on the 6, 8 and charleston transition lesson).

6 ct, 8 ct, & Charleston Transitions

In the beginning, transitioning between different rhythms and different moves can be difficult and intimidating. However, progress is impossible without failure. We like to think of it as "Fail Forward". With time and experience, these transitions will become easier. Practice, laugh, smile, and repeat!

Swing Out with an Inside Turn

The inside turn is one of the easiest Swing Out variations. Once you learn to line up your shoulders with your partner on count 3 and 4, you will have the technique to do literally hundreds of Swing Out variations, including this one. 

Leading and Following Basic Transitions

In the beginning, transitioning between different rhythms and different moves can be difficult and intimidating. However, progress is impossible without failure. We like to think of it as "Fail Forward". With time and experience, these transitions will become easier. Practice, laugh, smile, and repeat!

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